Disruptive TV talk about The Leaders Guide to Impact

From WeAreTheCity’s Future Leaders blog

We were recently inspired by a appearing on Disruptive TV we enjoyed filming a short session about “The Leaders Guide to Impact” published by the Financial Times.

We had such fun drawing on the glass board screen and explaining in more depth about the details in the book.

We all have an impact, every minute every day. Leadership is the act and the art of influencing others so it you have to influence others then you are a leader. This book has something for everyone.

In this clip you can see and hear us talk about the book and the three parts to the book.

Part One – What is Impact? The why and how of achieving Impact

Here we talk about the ripple affect that you can have and how you are a creator of the culture, we all have a responsibility for it.

Part Two – Your impact on your various audiences/stakeholders

In this section we get very specific about the impact you have on your:

  • Employees, people who work for you
  • Impact on people more senior that you- your bosses
  • People at the same level/ your Peers
  • Your Impact on the board or senior executive/leadership teams
  • Your external impact on your stakeholders

We explain more about the Executive Presence Sweet spot and creating your stakeholder map.

Part Three – Impact for different desired outcomes

We all have to impact outcomes so in this section we describe how you can create greater outcomes . If you want to create the following outcomes you can follow the roadmap:

  • Collaborative impact
  • Change-driving impact
  • Innovative impact
  • Business sustainability impact

Great leadership and great teamwork rarely happen by chance. Even the best leaders and the best teams can, with strategic intention and focused effort, become even better – more impactful.

“The Leaders Guide to Impact” is not just a book, it’s a whole impact toolbox.

Take a look at this Disruptive TV shoot for some inspiration: https://www.comparethecloud.net/articles/what-is-impact-what-impact-are-you-having-as-a-leader-opening-lines/

About the authors

Mandy Flint & Elisabet Vinberg Hearn, multi-award-winning authors of “Leading Teams – 10 Challenges: 10 Solutions” and ”The Team Formula”.

Their latest book “The Leader’s Guide to Impact” published April 2019 by Financial Times International is an in-depth practical guide to creating the impact you want. 

You can download a free chapter of the book at www.2020visionleader.com

Praise for “The Leader’s Guide to Impact” – “If there is one book you read on leadership, this is it. It’s jam-packed with practical tips, stories and frameworks to help you to be the best leader you can possibly be by taking control of your impact on those around you. Elisabet and Mandy hit the leadership nail on the head every time! I wish this book was around 20 years ago!”  Vanessa Vallely, OBE, Managing Director, WeAreTheCity, author, “Heels of Steel”

Generosity at work

From WeAreTheCity’s Future Leaders Blog

Gone are the days when people could hold on to information, thinking that ”knowledge is power”.

The speed of change means that unhelpful, competitive thinking is no longer desirable nor sensible. The era of openness and even more transparency is upon us.

Any organisation that wants to raise levels of innovation and change progression needs to proactively get their employees communicating better, generously sharing what they know, their expertise, insights and experience, as well as their ideas.

However, if there is no culture of sharing, changing this can take some time. So, there’s not time to wait, get the ball rolling if you want to increase innovation in your organisation.

Here are some tangible strategies to get employees to share what they know:

Be a role model – share what you know

If you’re the leader, make sure you are a role model for what you want others to do. In this case it means you need to be the one who starts sharing. This could for example mean that in team meetings you share observations you have made about competitors, industry trends or ideas you have for how you could change the way you do something as a team. As a team member you can also do this, you don’t have to be the leader to share. As a team member you can also become a role model, sharing can make you a kind of “informal” leader – as leadership is the act and art of influencing others.

Praise and recognise people who share

Notice when people share, thank them and make the connection between their sharing and what it has led to or could lead to. For example: “Thanks for sharing. Now that we all know what competitor X is doing, we can have a creative discussion about how we meet that competitive challenge”. If you reward this behaviour then you will see the ripple effect of the sharing continuing and spreading.

Host a “PODSÔ

Make sharing easy by holding specific sharing events. We call these “PODS™” (Power Of Dynamic Sharing). Do you need to know what people know/think about a specific subject? Then invite them to an hour or two of dynamic sharing on that particular subject. These are the high-level steps involved:

  1. Decide what you want to achieve by running a PODS™
  2. Invite the people who can have relevant input (keeping in mind that there may be people who may at first seem remote to the subject, but could still give valuable input based on their role, experience or expertise) These can often be the people who have the most innovative ideas.
  3. Prepare for the session by creating a series of very open questions that can draw out answers or trigger discussion as needed
  4. In the session, reiterate the purpose and what people are expected to do (ie. “you are here to share your knowledge on subject X”)
  5. Gather as much information as you can, if possible, captured on flipcharts so the groups can see the output and keep building on the discussion if relevant.
  6. Draw any conclusions that are needed then and there in the meeting – and communicate next steps (ie “I will now use your input for this….”)
  7. Use the new information you have gained about the subject – and keep the relevant people (including those who contributed) informed of progress.

Make links to the big picture

Talk to your team about how you all contribute to the overall vision of the organisation, and how sharing information with each other helps fulfil the team’s purpose and contribution to the bigger picture.

The most important reason why team members need to generously share what they know is that EVERYONE knows something that the others don’t. Don’t waste this opportunity for growth and success! What could you share today?

Three steps to relationship mastery

From WeAreTheCity’s Future Leaders blog

Team of diverse young businesspeople in meeting
In fact, a major factor for the survival of our species over time has been, and continues to be, our ability to connect with and collaborate with others.

So, building strong, collaborative, creatively challenging and trustful relationships could be the most important thing you ever focus on.

Who are the people you need to build strong relationships with?

How about:

  • Your peers
  • Your employees
  • Your boss
  • Your boss’ boss
  • Your customers
  • Your board of directors
  • Your business partners
  • Your suppliers
  • Your contractors
  • Your competitors
  • Politicians
  • Other decisions makers
  • And more…

Yes, the list is potentially long. But don’t let that scare or deter you.

To strategically and carefully consider your stakeholder is not an optional task – it’s one of the most important ones on your list. It’s only by connecting respectfully and genuinely that we can be successful – and we don’t mean successful in a selfish “just for me” kind of way. No, we mean successful in a bigger context, being able to make a difference to something bigger than ourselves; like solving someone’s problem or creating solutions that evolve for the benefit of others over time.

If you currently don’t spend enough time considering how to cultivate those important relationships, here are three steps to help you on your way:

Map out the people you impact and the people that impact you – your stakeholders

Reflect on what they need from you and what you need from them. Then build a plan for what you need to do to meet those needs. Specify how, when and where you will connect and interact with them.

Keep in mind that not all your stakeholders have equal importance, and that’s OK

It doesn’t mean that some people are less important or valuable, but let’s be honest and pragmatic – you won’t have time to give everyone equal attention (nor would you or they want it) so you will need to put more focus on those that have the biggest role in your work reality. Don’t just think short-term here, remember to build relationships for the future too – think long-term too.

Take a genuine interest in these key stakeholders; ask questions to understand them better, listen to them, take the time to create a real connection with them

Connect on the human level by being genuinely interested, not just in a transactional kind of way. Think about how you make them feel, what they experience when they interact with you – think about your impact.

Caring for and carefully managing your stakeholders will help you build the relationships that you are dependent on to enjoy your work as well as deliver great results over time. It’s a fun and meaningful part of everyone’s work and it’s never too soon or too late to start. What step can you take today to lay the foundation for those crucial relationships you need, not just today, but in the future?

Leadership stripped bare


From WeAreTheCity’s Future Leaders Blog

“But bosses can pretty much do what they want, that’s what’s so sad”

These were the exact words said by a woman pacing up and down a deserted aisle in the supermarket one evening. She was on her mobile talking to what seemed to be a colleague, based on the contents of their conversation. I didn’t want to eavesdrop but those words spoke volumes about her state of mind and were hard not to hear.

There was a sense of resignation about her comment and her body language that really made me wonder what had happened, specifically. I couldn’t really hang around to listen, but I would have loved to hear more.

As I left the store, I reflected on the impact a leader can have – for better and for worse.

A leader’s responsibility is to lead and operate in such a way that his or her employees can better do their jobs. When leaders do that effectively, they include and involve the people in question rather than just “doing things their own way”.

You never know when a moment and a few sincere words can have an impact on a life
Zig Ziglar

I don’t know what happened to the woman in the supermarket, or her boss, but I know that leaders that want to get results should pay heed to the impact they are having on people around them and include people all along the way. Otherwise they may end up with so much resistance that good results become impossible, and everyone loses out.

Leadership stripped bare is quite simple:

  • Share a vision, give direction (so people understand WHY)
  • Involve people in HOW to get there
  • See people (everyone wants to be seen and heard), see and understand the individual
  • Make use of each person’s unique strengths and possible contributions
  • Foster open communication. Never shoot the messenger – if things are going on, you are better off knowing about it!
  • Let go of the need to be right (no-one has all the answers anyway), keep an open mind and encourage others to do the same
  • Follow up and give feedback, so people know how they are doing and that what they are doing matters
  • And be genuine (find your own leadership style that suits you) while always being respectful

It’s not always easy to lead but taking control of your impact makes it easier. Think about how you make people feel. Choose the impact you want to have for the future.

About the authors

Mandy Flint & Elisabet Vinberg Hearn, award-winning authors of ”The Team Formula”.

Their latest book, multi-award-winning ”Leading Teams – 10 Challenges: 10 Solutions”, published by Financial Times International is a practical tool for building winning teams. You can download a free chapter of the book at www.leadingteamsbook.com

Praise for ”Leading Teams: ”Leadership is about effective conversations. This book is a very useful ready reckoner for leaders everywhere seeking the words and methods needed each day at work. Sanjay Gupta, CEO English Helper Inc, India.

Have smart questions not smart answers

From WeAreTheCity’s Future Leader’s blog 
If someone asks us a question or asks for our advice, it is amazing how many times we feel that we have to know the answer. Yet sometimes the opposite is true.

The most effective and successful people will not always just give you the answer but will instead ask you really good, smart questions to help you find the answer yourself. When you are given the answer by someone you don’t learn as much as you would if you found that answer for yourself.

We can use Stephen Covey’s insightful thinking:

“Seek first to understand then be understood.”

This may sound like such a simple phrase yet if we apply it, it has a big impact.

If you ask questions you can learn from what the other person is saying and then decide if your answer really was the best answer. Invariably there is a better, enhanced answer after a few open and inviting questions. This allows you to explore more, learn more and indeed get to a better result or solution. It opens you up to be innovative and invites fresh new thinking, which can create new ideas and new thoughts.

As the world moves into more complexity and with even more change ahead, we will find ourselves being a member of many work teams or partnerships where new solutions need to be found. In those constellations we cannot possibly have all the answers or indeed keep up with ALL the changes needed. So we need to work together as a team to find the answers and ask smart questions to get us to the smart answers

For practical tips on asking questions, check out our previous post herehttp://wearethecity.in/future-leaders-questions/

Go ahead give it a go today, be ready with your smart questions and get to even smarter answers.

About the authors

Mandy Flint & Elisabet Vinberg Hearn, award-winning authors of ”The Team Formula”.

Their latest book, multi-award-winning ”Leading Teams – 10 Challenges: 10 Solutions”, published by Financial Times International is a practical tool for building winning teams. You can download a free chapter of the book here.

Praise for ”Leading Teams: ”Enjoyable to read. Simple to understand. Practical to implement. A must read for team members or leadersDebbie Fogel-Monnissen, Executive Vice President, International Markets Finance Officer, Mastercard, NY, USA

It’s OK to turn your back on the audience

From WeAreTheCity’s Future Leader’s blog 
Imagine sitting in the audience at a classical music concert, seeing the faces of the musicians but usually only the back of the conductor. In fact, the conductor spends very little time facing you, the audience.

They spend most of their time facing the orchestra, which is effectively their team. They are guiding them to play beautifully and with great impact together.

And have you noticed how perfectly the musicians play together, seemingly unaware of each other, yet clearly very aware as they harmonise with each other through their various instruments, providing their own unique contribution to the music.
And then, once in awhile, the conductor faces the audience and shares what’s going on – what they are doing, what we can expect, what they will or have delivered. And we, the audience, feel seen and well taken care of.

The interaction between conductor and orchestra is a great example of teamwork and leadership. By focusing a large chunk of their time on the team, the conductor helps them work and perform better together than they ever could have done on their own.

You can’t play a symphony on your own!

So take inspiration from the world of music.

If you’re a leader, ask yourself this question: Am I giving the team the focus and guidance they really need to be able to deliver or am I focusing too much of my time outside the team? Are you for example attending meetings all day, hence not having enough time for your team and its needs?

All leadership is of course a balance act; you need to carefully balance all your stakeholders. Do you get the balance right? Are there maybe stakeholders that you give more focus than they need or want? Are there stakeholders that need more focus than they are currently getting?

Take inspiration from the world of music and reflect on how you spend your time as a leader. Give the team enough focus and support so that they can deliver with your guidance and support. Orchestras are also a powerful reminder of how important all team members are.

You can’t play a symphony on your own!

You are unique!

From WeAreTheCity’s Future Leader’s blog 
If someone asks us a question or asks for our advice, it is amazing how many times we feel that we have to know the answer. Yet sometimes the opposite is true.

The most effective and successful people will not always just give you the answer but will instead ask you really good, smart questions to help you find the answer yourself. When you are given the answer by someone you don’t learn as much as you would if you found that answer for yourself.

We can use Stephen Covey’s insightful thinking:

“Seek first to understand then be understood.”

This may sound like such a simple phrase yet if we apply it, it has a big impact.

If you ask questions you can learn from what the other person is saying and then decide if your answer really was the best answer. Invariably there is a better, enhanced answer after a few open and inviting questions. This allows you to explore more, learn more and indeed get to a better result or solution. It opens you up to be innovative and invites fresh new thinking, which can create new ideas and new thoughts.

As the world moves into more complexity and with even more change ahead, we will find ourselves being a member of many work teams or partnerships where new solutions need to be found. In those constellations we cannot possibly have all the answers or indeed keep up with ALL the changes needed. So we need to work together as a team to find the answers and ask smart questions to get us to the smart answers

For practical tips on asking questions, check out our previous post herehttp://wearethecity.in/future-leaders-questions/

Go ahead give it a go today, be ready with your smart questions and get to even smarter answers.

About the authors

Mandy Flint & Elisabet Vinberg Hearn, award-winning authors of ”The Team Formula”.

Their latest book, multi-award-winning ”Leading Teams – 10 Challenges: 10 Solutions”, published by Financial Times International is a practical tool for building winning teams. You can download a free chapter of the book here.

Praise for ”Leading Teams: ”Enjoyable to read. Simple to understand. Practical to implement. A must read for team members or leadersDebbie Fogel-Monnissen, Executive Vice President, International Markets Finance Officer, Mastercard, NY, USA

It’s OK to have an attitude

From WeTheCity’s Future Leaders blog

Your attitude matters. In life, at work, in leadership.

Attitude, perspective, approach, outlook – whatever we call it – it changes or impacts everything.

Imagine if something unexpected or even unwanted happens. What if you ‘failed’ at something, or even lost your job, or you simply didn’t meet your goal?

We can’t control things that happen, that’s a given. What we can control though is our attitude. We can choose our outlook and perspective on what has happened.

This may sound obvious and simple, but yet, when we really need that attitude, we don’t always look for it. We get stuck in the ‘automatic’ reaction of anger, sadness, disappointment or sense of failure. The key word here is to go look for the attitude. It’s definitely a choice and that choice can be made at any time, in any situation, whatever we are facing.

And an easy way to look for it and find it, is to be prepared with an attitude, a thought, a mantra if you like, which can promptly get you on the right path of taking the next step to progress, success and results.

Here are a few examples that have helped us keep an optimistic attitude in challenging situations:

“Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn” – Anonymous

“It’s all happening perfectly” – Susan Jeffers PhD

“When things go wrong, don’t go with them” – Elvis Presley

Yes, our attitude is everything. Being able to look at any situation and find something good or at least valuable in it is a question of choosing our attitude to it.

We have met so many people who have been disappointed or sad or angry when something happened and who have later on realized that it was the best that could have happened to them.

  • People who have failed at something and then realised that they never would have come up with that brilliant new idea unless they had failed and had been forced to rethink.
  • People who have lost their job and then understood that it was the push they needed to take the long overdue step of doing something new that they had wanted to do for a while but not dared to do.
  • People who have experienced conflict within their team and realised that it made them take a new approach to collaboration, leading to better team climate and better results.

Some of the best leaders we have ever met are extremely good at this. And as we are really keen for leaders to get ready for the future – do you think this a crucial ability to have? So do we. So many things will not go our way – it’s part of change – but our way of looking at it is ALWAYS ours to choose.

Yes, attitude is everything, and one of the few things in life completely within our own control – if we choose to take that control.

So go on, have an attitude! You’ll like it.

About the authors

Mandy Flint & Elisabet Vinberg Hearn, award-winning authors of ”The Team Formula”.

Their latest book, multi-award-winning ”Leading Teams – 10 Challenges: 10 Solutions”, published by Financial Times International is a practical tool for building winning teams. You can download a free chapter of the book at www.leadingteamsbook.com

Praise for ”Leading Teams: ”Enjoyable to read. Simple to understand. Practical to implement. A must read for team members or leaders”Debbie Fogel-Monnissen, Executive Vice President, International Markets Finance Officer, Mastercard, NY, USA

Everyone is a leader


WeAreTheCity’s Future Leaders blog

You may aspire to be a leader or you may already have a leadership role.

Regardless of what your official role is, what we know is that you influence and have an impact on people every day. And you are therefore a leader. In fact, many of the most influential leaders in the world are informal leaders. They are the people that that others listen to, and also feel heard and seen by.

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Leadership is not really something you learn in a classroom. Yes, you can learn useful principles, acquire relevant models and tools that can help you practice leadership, but real leadership development occurs when you start to apply your knowledge in your daily work situations. It’s how you act and behave that builds your leadership effectiveness and influence.

Yes, leadership is most definitely about influencing others. To influence is to have an impact. And impact happens through how you behave towards others.

What impact are you having? And what impact could you have?

Being leaders ourselves, and having worked with many hundreds of leaders around the world, here are some of our observations of what the best, most influential leaders do. They:

  • Take an interest in and care about other people
  • See the uniqueness in each person and how they can contribute to the team and the organisation
  • Listen attentively to others
  • Stay 100% present in the moment
  • Involve others and invite them to contribute and participate in things that impact them
  • Recognise when people do a good job
  • Hold themselves and others accountable
  • Practice what they preach
  • Convey a clear sense of purpose and vision for the team
  • Are generous in sharing their knowledge, skills, ideas and wisdom
  • Are authentic, they stay true to themselves, making the most of their unique strengths and capabilities

This is not an exhaustive list, but it gives a number of pointers on how influence works.

We would love to hear from you.

What are the best experiences you’ve had with leaders around you? How did they behave and how did it impact you? What great leadership have you seen?

Please share your thoughts, observations and comments below. Thank you.